DO YOUR THING, GIRL

Archetype of a 5 Star, 2018; 60 x 48 in., acrylic, spray paint, glitter, ink, and cut paper collage on canvas. Credit: Courtesy of Kravets/Wehby Gallery and the artist. - via thecut.com

What’s your take on knockoff designer fashions?

Artist and Detroit-native, Jamea Richmond-Edwards, has her own unique perspective on the matter — when it comes to knockoffs and genuine articles alike. The seasoned professional has graced the Kravets Wehby Gallery in New York with her new art show called, “Fly Girl Fly”.

According to The Cut, the show is meant to depict the relationship between Black women and luxury clothing, helping to spark thought about how the Black woman identifies herself in luxury wear. The same article quotes Richmond-Edwards as saying that the new art display will highlight “the belief that, as a black woman, if I present myself a certain way, perhaps the world will treat me differently.”

Holding an MFA from Howard University, the artist uses some of her work to examine representations of Black women, or lack thereof, in high fashion media.

While most of us may regard expensive items as status symbols, this thought isn’t necessarily the driving force behind our purchasing decisions. Or is it? Could it be that this belief in receiving better treatment from others as a result of acquiring these status symbols, was something passed down through generations of Black women? It’s an interesting perspective indeed. The artist, however, doesn’t argue that cashing out on your favorite pair of flip flops is necessarily a bad thing. According to The Cut, she says that the exhibition’s title, ‘Fly Girl Fly’, “is really just to imply these girls are fly, they’re stylish … In spite of these constructs that exist, be free, even if it’s with splurging or wearing a knockoff bag, go ahead and do your thing.” 

We agree. Do your thing, girl!

Check out more information about the exhibit here.

Shirt With Lace Heart, 2018; 72 x 128 in. acrylic, spray paint, glitter, ink, tulle, lace, and cut paper collage on canvas. Credit: Courtesy of Kravets/Wehby Gallery and the artist. – via TheCut.com

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